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Summer Ad Deadline

Summer Ad Deadline
The advertising deadline for the Summer magazine/auction catalog is Friday, June 2ndClick the button below to view the Ad Contract.Click here for the Ad Contract

Important Deadlines
Quality Whitetail Deer Auction Consignment DeadlineMonday, June 5thClick here for the Consignment Form!

Grand Auction Lot Donation Catalog Deadline Monday, June 12th

Click here for Donation Form

Convention Program Ad Deadline Friday, June 16thClick here for the Ad Contract

DBC Wildlife Scholarship Entry Deadline Thursday, June 15th

Click here for the Scholarship Application

Deer Breeders Corp. | 972.289.3100 | info@dbcDeer.com | www.dbcDeer.com
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Fantastic Sable Bull!

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www.wildlifebuyer.com

www.exoticclassifieds.com

www.exoticprices.com

Don’t let Texas deer disease live and spread to humans

Don’t let Texas deer disease live and spread to humans

4 Tricks for Gobbling in a Gobbler

HOW TO |

4 Tricks for Gobbling in a Gobbler

Mention gobbling as a turkey hunting call and some traditionalists will slap you across the face. Not only do they scream about the safety factor, but they also stress it isn’t a conventional call to incorporate. I say, yes, beware of the safety issue and be on the lookout for other hunters stalking you. If someone would stalk you at any time during a hunt, speak to them in a calm and loud voice. As for customs and tradition, bah humbug.

I pack a gobbler call and use it despite the Trump-style bad press it continually generates. How can a gobble call help your turkey hunting success? Consider these tactics to use with a gobble call.

  1. This one is a no brainer: Gobble after sunset, and if you’re within hearing distance of a testosterone-charged tom, it likely will gobble back from the roost. Note the location of the roost or move closer, and pinpoint the position for a morning rendezvous.
  2. Gobble in the morning. How many times have you found yourself in the woods after sunrise with the turkeys as silent as an investigated congressman? Gobble calls can help find a gobbler after morning fly down. After toms hit the ground and go into their strut-zone morning ritual, they often shut up for a period of time. A gobble from you can break the ice and re-start the conversation.
  3. Pick a fight in the midmorning. It’s common for a gobbler to gobble back at hen calls, yet remain cemented in place. If you add in a gobble, cuts, aggressive yelps and fighting purrs, then you might just stir the pot enough for a gobbler to investigate in “Rocky” mode.
  4. Finally, if I’m hopeless at midday with no turkeys in sight, I occasionally let out a gobble while hiking a property. I think of it as trolling, and it could spark a lackadaisical gobbler into responding. Once you get his attention, add in some hen chatter and let him map a course to you.

Using a gobble call can sometimes increase success in your turkey game.

Safety is a serious concern while using a gobbler call, so use common sense. It probably isn’t wise to use a gobble call in a heavily hunted public area. Using it from a ground blind is advised because hunters will hopefully spot your hide. At all times, you should hang an orange hat or cloth in a tree above your setup site to advertise your presence. And, as previously noted, if you do spy someone stalking toward you, speak to them in a calm, clear and loud voice to announce your location.

Like our new President who excels in nontraditional actions, using a gobbler call is definitely not a traditional turkey call. Nevertheless, sometimes a bit of nontradition is exactly what you need to find success.

Several years ago, I was hunkered in my ground blind and my hen yelps were going unnoticed due to the amount of competing, real turkey chatter in the area. I switched to a gobble call mixed with cutting, and within minutes a group of gobblers strutted by my blind at less than 20 yards. My Mathews bow assisted in letting the air out of the one with the most PSI (photo above).

ANIMAL CAPTURE AND RESTRAINT | CHEMICAL IMMOBILIZATION

ANIMAL CAPTURE AND RESTRAINT | CHEMICAL IMMOBILIZATION

In the preceding entries you learned about capture and handling techniques that don’t require drugs.  So, what’s the deal, why do we even need chemical immobilization? Well, we use it mostly for safety, both the animal’s and care giver’s, and often it is needed just to get near an animal.  Big pastures are awesome. Lots of space allows our hoofstock species to do normal things, like they would in the wild. But when the vets need to examine a patient with their hands on it, say to suture a wound or help with a difficult delivery of a calf, or an animal needs to be transported to another area or zoo, we often have to use remote delivery of immobilization drugs to tranquilize the animal safely.

A number of different types of darting systems are available, but most incorporate a projectile dart that is shot from a special gun.  On impact the dart injects the prepared dose of drugs via gas pressure or a gunpowder charge.  Fossil Rim Wildlife Center routinely uses three types of remote delivery systems, including a rifle with gunpowder fired and gunpowder charged metal darts (as shown in Image 1), a CO2 powered pistol with plastic air charged darts (as shown in Images 2 and 3), and a good old fashioned blowpipe with plastic air charged darts.

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Image 1: Rifle with gunpowder fired and gunpowder charged metal darts

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Image 2: CO2 powered pistol with plastic air charged darts

Darting Grant's Zebras

Image 3: CO2 powered pistol with plastic air charged darts

Another fantastic tool used for closer range delivery of immobilizing drugs, antibiotics or vaccines, is a spring loaded pole syringe (image below). Its use requires the animal to be within about 6 feet of the person administering the drugs.

Using the pole syringe to deliver additional reversal agent to an addax.

Spring loaded pole syringe

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Vet wearing face shield while loading drugs into dart.

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Dart Box

Each situation requiring the use of chemical immobilization is considered in light of what technique will provide the safest and most effective delivery of the drugs. For example, the majority of the hoofstock species require darting at long range (up to 50 meters), and therefore the rifle is most appropriate.

Chemical Capture of a Roan Antelope

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Driving sedated addra gazelle to a holding pen.

For smaller bodied animals like cheetah, coatis, and wolves, blow darting is the best technique, as it causes very little dart associated trauma and these species are conditioned to come into smaller areas so they don’t require the long range capability of the dart gun. Cheetah also tolerate the pole syringe well, and when used appropriately, is more consistent than the blow pipe. The CO2 pistol is used in the smaller enclosures where ranges are shorter and with the giraffe since they are usually accustomed to coming up closer than some of the other hoofstock species. Additionally, the pistol accommodates very large darts, needed for the large drug volume used for giraffe.

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Providing supplemental oxygen during a giraffe immobilization

Rhinos are typically trained to perform several behaviors, including the presentation of a forelimb. In this case, a rhino can usually be hand injected, just like a person getting an injection from their doctor, but sometimes may require pole syringing or darting if they are not conditioned or are apprehensive.

Kusamona melanoma surgery 6Apr07

Black rhino presenting forelimb; vet and curator preparing to hand inject sedation drugs.

Emmet AH duplicate

White rhino immobilization; we blindfold rhinos and use ear muffs to reduce external stimuli.

No chemical immobilization is taken lightly, due to the possibility of complications that could include physical injury during the induction or recovery period or physiological complications from the drugs themselves. For example, the veterinarians may decide to monitor a lameness in an animal like a giraffe for a few days instead of immobilizing it right away for diagnostics. Giraffe are large animals with unique physiology (like really high blood pressure at the level of their heart) that can change significantly when drugged and lying on their side. Special animals require special preparation and handling. For example, during a giraffe immobilization the neck and head are stretched out on a padded board or ladder that is tilted on an angle to the tailgate of a truck. This serves two purposes: it helps to keep the neck muscles from kinking or cramping, which can be life threatening, and helps maintain adequate blood pressure to the kidneys by keeping a large volume of blood from pooling in the long jugular veins of the neck.

Nettie hoof procedure

Giraffe immobilization; neck is stretched out on padded board.

Nettie Hoof Trim Giraffe (5)-CAP duplicate

Giraffe hoof trim

Special animals also require special drugs. To deliver an appropriate dose to a large, cantankerous animal remotely, we need something that is potent and of small volume. Ideally, the drug would also take effect very quickly, stopping the animal before running out of sight, and it would also be reversible. The class of drugs that fits this most closely is the ultra-potent opioids. They act fast to induce anesthesia and also give pain control (important for surgical procedures) and, perhaps coolest of all, they are completely reversible with the administration of the antidote (also called the reversal drug or antagonist). So, once the procedure is done, we give the opioid antagonist and within a few minutes the animal is standing and often ready to assimilate back into its herd, able to interact normally with other animals.

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Loading Grant’s zebra onto stretcher and then into trailer.

Fossil Rim’s animal care and animal health staff have extensive experience with the chemical immobilization of many species. Sometimes we are asked to help at other zoos that may never have had to immobilize something as tricky as a giraffe. Performing around 150-200 chemical immobilization procedures a year means we are always gaining experience and honing our skills, but, still, nobody likes a giraffe immobilization!

By: Holly Haefele (Veterinarian and Director of Animal Health)

Texas Deer Association Up-coming Events

HIGHLIGHTED EVENTS

EVENT VIEWS NAVIGATION

Upcoming Events

Events List Navigation

March 2017

March 31 @ 8:00 amApril 2 @ 5:00 pm
The Henry B. Gonzales Convention Center, 900 East Market Street
San Antonio, TX 78205 United States

April 2017

April 1 @ 1:00 pm5:00 pm
South Dakota Animal Industry Board, Pierre, SD United States
April 7April 8
Warrens, WI,
April 7April 8
Blue Ridge Ranch, 1128 CR 312
Llano, TX 78643 United States
APRIL 8, 2017 10296 W FM 580 LAMPASAS, TX 76550 JOIN IN FOR A DAY OF FUN, FOOD, PRIZES, SKEET SHOOT AND ARCHERY TOURNAMENT FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION, CONTACT JASON MARONEY AT 512-748-2810 OR JWMARONEY@GMAIL.COM
April 27April 30
Georgia World Congress Center, 285 Andrew Young International Blvd NW
Atlanta, GA 30313 United States
April 29 @ 5:00 pm11:00 pm
Wild Acres Brewing Company, 1734 E. El Paso Street, Ste. 190
Fort Worth, TX 76102 United States

BENEFITING THE FORT WORTH CYSTIC FIBROSIS FOUNDATION & TDA   BANDS: JASON BOLAND & THE STRAGGLERS STONEY LA RUE   TICKET SALES TBD   DOORS OPEN 5PM DINNER 6PM AUCTION 7PM BANDS 8:30-11PM

May 2017

May 1
May 4May 7
McAllen Convention Center, 700 Convention Center Blvd
McAllen, TX 78501 United States

100% DONATION FOR VICTIMS IN PANHANDLE – AUCTIONING TWO ARABIAN ORYX BULLS!

100% Donation from this auction to victims of the panhandle fire!!! Arabian Oryx Bull! Auctions ends today at 1:00 p.m. Please reach out and help support the devastation left behind by the fire!

Exotic Wildlife Association NEWS ALERT

Exotic Wildlife Association
NEWS ALERT
“Promoting Conservation through Commerce”
Plan for EWA Contests!
 
Exotic Wildlife Association
2017 Annual Membership Meeting
March 2-5, 2017
Venison Product Contest
The Exotic Wildlife Association will be sponsoring a venison product competition on Friday, March 3rd at the EWA Annual Membership Meeting at the YO Ranch Hotel in Kerrville, Texas.
Categories offered for competition will be
  1. Snack sticks
  2. Sausage
  3. Deli meat
  4. Jerky.
Participants may enter all four categories. Registrations open at 8:00 amon Friday, March 3rd and participants are asked to bring in 4 lbs. of each product by noon on Friday, March 3rd. 2 lbs. of each product is needed for the tasting competition and an additional 2 lbs. of each product will be auctioned off on Saturday night’s auction.
Attendees of the conference will have an opportunity to vote for their favorite in each category on Fridayafternoon. Awards will be presented to the 1st place winners in all four categories, plus a “Best of Show” award.
2017 EWA Photo Contest
The Exotic Wildlife Association will be sponsoring a photo contest at the EWA conference on Saturday, March 4th.
Winning photos will be used in future EWA publications. They will not be returned unless you specify so. Certificates will be given to the top three in each category. The categories are:
1. Buck/Bull/Stag
2. Fawn/Calf
3. Humor & Action
4.Miscellaneous
Photos are restricted to 8×10 size or smaller.  Amateurs only please.
Be sure to put your name on the back of each photo and the category you wish to enter.
Photos must be entered before 12:00 noon on Friday, March 3rd. Voting will be March 4th until 4:00 pm

Click here for the Entry Form! 

 

For more information on the Venison Product Contest or Photo Contest, please contact Laurie Seale at 830-928-3143 or maplehillfarms@centurytel.net.


Exotic Wildlife Association
Charly Seale, Executive Director

105 Henderson Branch Rd., West
Ingram, Texas 78025
 
February 15, 2017
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Alan Warren Outdoors Radio Show 


Female Wildebeest up for auction!

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Websites of interest

www.wildlifebuyer.com

www.exoticprices.com

www.exoticclassifieds.com

www.circlehranchtexas.com

WOW!!!! Get logged in to Wildlifebuyer right now! Over 40 auctions ending today!

WOW!!!! Get logged in to Wildlifebuyer right now! Over 40 auctions ending today!
View this email in your browser
We have some outstanding auctions closing today at 1 pm! Yes you read it right….. We have 40 auctions ending! Get logged in and check it out!!!! Wildlifebuyer is the #1 online auction site to buy and sell animals!

Be sure to check out the gorgeous Axis Bucks!

If you have questions selling or buying on Wildlifebuyer be sure to call the office and talk to one of our helpful associates!

Have a wonderful week!

~WLB Staff

WildlifeBuyer.com

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Events taking place in Texas today.

Events taking place in Texas today.

Jan 17, 2017

Aubrey, TX

Boxcar Bandits

Jan 17, 2017
110 West Mulberry Street,Denton, Texas 76201, USA
Aubrey, TX 76227

Orange, TX

The Jackie Robinson Story

Jan 17, 2017
707 W. Main Ave.
Orange, TX 77630

Aubrey, TX

Boxcar Bandits

Jan 17, 2017
110 West Mulberry Street,Denton, Texas 76201, USA
Aubrey, TX 76227

Kerrville, TX

73rd Annual Hill Country District Junior Livestock Show

Jan 17, 2017 – Jan 23, 2017
3785 Hwy. 27 E.
Kerrville, TX 78028

Orange, TX

The Jackie Robinson Story

Jan 17, 2017
707 W. Main Ave.
Orange, TX 77630

Check out these websites!

www.wildlifebuyer.com

www.exoticprices.com

www.exoticclassifieds.com

www.circlehranchtexas.com

1.0 RED SHEEP……BUY NOW!!! NO WAITING!!! $2,450.00

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1.0 RED SHEEP…..BUY NOW!!!   NO WAITING!!!   $2,450.00

Come Celebrate EWA’s 50th!

Exotic Wildlife Association
NEWS ALERT
“Promoting Conservation through Commerce”
Come Celebrate EWA’s 50th! 
Save the Date!

 

 

 

Please mark you calendars and save the date for the Exotic Wildlife Association’s celebration of 50 years promoting conservation through commerce.  Join your friends and fellow exotic and whitetail breeders March 2-5, 2017 at the YO Ranch Resort Hotel and Conference Center for a tremendous weekend full of great and entertaining activities.
For those who have always wanted to take the License to Carry course your association will offer this course for our members on Thursday, March 2beginning at 9:00 a.m. In Kerrville. The cost of the course is $80.00 dollars and will be limited to the first 100 registrants. All you need is your weapon, holster and 50 rounds of ammunition for the qualification course.
The membership meeting packets will be arriving in your mailbox next week so take advantage of the early bird registration price.
For more information on the annual membership meeting, the License to Carry course, sponsorship opportunities or to reserve a booth, contact the EWA office at 830-367-7761.

 

 

 

Exotic Wildlife Association
Charly Seale, Executive Director

105 Henderson Branch Rd., West
Ingram, Texas 78025

Exotic Wildlife Foundation News and Events

Exotic Wildlife Foundation
Exotic Wildlife Association

Our Mission

The Exotic Wildlife Association’s mission is to encourage and expand the conservation of both native and non-native hoofstock, and to help our members develop and strengthen the markets for their animals.

In 1967, a group of concerned ranchers with a vision for the future of the exotic wildlife industry, met to form an organization that later became the Exotic Wildlife Association. The association’s purpose since that first meeting has been to preserve the rights of exotic wildlife owners, and to promote the development and expansion of the exotic wildlife industry. The EWA has grown into what is now the oldest and one of the most successful associations of it’s type in North America.

Website designed & hosted by Outdoor Resources, LLC

Useful Websites!

www.wildlifebuyer.com

www.exoticprices.com

www.circlehranchtexas.com

www.exoticclassifieds.com

Why Animal Rights?

Why Animal Rights?

Almost all of us grew up eating meat, wearing leather, and going to circuses and zoos. Many of us bought our beloved “pets” at pet shops, had guinea pigs, and kept beautiful birds in cages. We wore wool and silk, ate McDonald’s burgers, and fished. We never considered the impact of these actions on the animals involved. For whatever reason, you are now asking the question: Why should animals have rights?

In his book Animal Liberation, Peter Singer states that the basic principle of equality does not require equal or identical treatment; it requires equal consideration. This is an important distinction when talking about animal rights. People often ask if animals should have rights, and quite simply, the answer is “Yes!” Animals surely deserve to live their lives free from suffering and exploitation. Jeremy Bentham, the founder of the reforming utilitarian school of moral philosophy, stated that when deciding on a being’s rights, “The question is not ‘Can they reason?’ nor ‘Can they talk?’ but ‘Can they suffer?’” In that passage, Bentham points to the capacity for suffering as the vital characteristic that gives a being the right to equal consideration. The capacity for suffering is not just another characteristic like the capacity for language or higher mathematics. All animals have the ability to suffer in the same way and to the same degree that humans do. They feel pain, pleasure, fear, frustration, loneliness, and motherly love. Whenever we consider doing something that would interfere with their needs, we are morally obligated to take them into account.

Supporters of animal rights believe that animals have an inherent worth—a value completely separate from their usefulness to humans. We believe that every creature with a will to live has a right to live free from pain and suffering. Animal rights is not just a philosophy—it is a social movement that challenges society’s traditional view that all nonhuman animals exist solely for human use. As PETA founder Ingrid Newkirk has said, “When it comes to pain, love, joy, loneliness, and fear, a rat is a pig is a dog is a boy. Each one values his or her life and fights the knife.” Watch a video with Ingrid Newkirk from the 2015 Animal Rights National Conference here. 

Only prejudice allows us to deny others the rights that we expect to have for ourselves. Whether it’s based on race, gender, sexual orientation, or species, prejudice is morally unacceptable. If you wouldn’t eat a dog, why eat a pig? Dogs and pigs have the same capacity to feel pain, but it is prejudice based on species that allows us to think of one animal as a companion and the other as dinner.

The PETA Practical Guide to Animal Rights

Take vital steps to cut thoughtless cruelty to animals out of your life and to educate others around you. Check out the most comprehensive book on animal rights available today! In The PETA Practical Guide to Animal Rights, PETA president Ingrid E. Newkirk provides hundreds of tips, stories, and resources. It’s PETA’s must-have guide to animal rights. Also available for the Kindle!

ORDER YOUR COPY OF PETA’S PRACTICAL GUIDE TO ANIMAL RIGHTS!