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Exotic Wildlife Association
NEWS ALERT
“Promoting Conservation through Commerce”
 Important News for Our Deer Industry (Microchip Bills)!

Deer breeders would like to be able to use microchips as an alternative form of identifying their breeder deer under TPWD permit system.  HB 2855 was filed for this purpose by amending the TPWD code to allow identifying breeder deer with microchips recognized by the U.S. Department of Agriculture with a unique alphanumeric number. The bill required the breeder that uses microchips to make available a microchip reader for the use by TPWD and TAHC personnel.

HB 2588 by Paddie authorizes TPWD to make regulations regarding the use of microchips. If the bill passes it would become in effect on September 1, 2017. The bill passed the House Culture, Recreation, and Tourism committee and awaits to be placed on House Calendar for a vote. Its companion in the senate, SB 1720 by Sen. Estes will be heard on May 8 in the Senate Agriculture, Water, and Rural Affairs Committee.

Exotic Wildlife Association
Charly Seale, Executive Director

105 Henderson Branch Rd., West
Ingram, Texas 78025

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Exotic Wildlife Association NEWS ALERT

Exotic Wildlife Association
NEWS ALERT
“Promoting Conservation through Commerce”
Texas Legislature Bill Alert
85(R) HB 338
Relating to acreage contracts and quantity contracts for the purchase of agricultural products.
5/3/2017 H Placed on General State Calendar
85(R) HB 748
Relating to certain costs associated with certain court proceedings for cruelly treated animals; authorizing fees and costs.
5/6/2017 H Placed on General State Calendar
85(R) HB 1891
Relating to a documented member of the Kickapoo Traditional Tribe of Texas hunting certain deer.
5/4/2017 H Placed on General State Calendar
kickapoo deer hunting
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Exotic Wildlife Association
Charly Seale, Executive Director

105 Henderson Branch Rd., West
Ingram, Texas 78025

High School Trap Shooting Team Photo Rejected From Yearbook Because of Guns

NEWS |

High School Trap Shooting Team Photo Rejected From Yearbook Because of Guns

The photo shows 60 team members lined up wearing their uniform and resting a shotgun on their shoulder.

The school’s superintendent, Steve Westerberg, apparently told 5 Eyewitness News in an email that the student handbook “doesn’t allow firearms or weapons to be displayed.” He also noted that parents have been urging for several years now for the team to be included in the yearbook.

“This rule has been in affect since the school started sponsoring a Trap Shooting Team a couple years ago,” Westerberg wrote.

Clayton Birsall, one of the team members and also part of the school’s baseball team, thinks that his gun is really no different than his baseball bat.

“That’s what you use in the sport,” Birdsall said. “It’s just natural.”

This whole yearbook thing has created quite the stir for Big Lake, and it will promptly become a topic discussed at the school board meeting scheduled for 6:30 p.m. Thursday.

Gun control is one thing, but what about bullets?

Gun control is one thing, but what about bullets?

Under federal and many state laws, the same people prohibited from buying guns are prohibited from buying bullets. But virtually no systems are in place to enforce that. In 46 states, anyone can walk into a store — or click on a website — and buy bullets, no questions asked.

Earlier this week President Obama announced a series of executive actions on gun control — a frank acknowledgment of the political impossibility of getting even the most modest gun background check bills through Congress. The idea that states could enforce background checks for those buying bullets seems far-fetched.

 Not so in California. “If someone isn’t allowed to possess ammunition, we should probably make sure they can’t buy it,” says Yashar Hedayat, a spokesman for Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom, a Democrat, who is spearheading a new effort on ammunition purchases.

That effort, the Safety for All Act, would require a background check for anyone seeking to buy bullets, using the same system as the existing one for guns. The proposed new law includes several other gun control provisions, including new regulations for ammunition dealers. The state — plus 44 others and the federal government — currently has no licensing or regulation for those who sell bullets.

“We’re not being hyperbolic when we say that a daycare center could sell ammunition,” Hedayat says.

The ballot initiative is currently being reviewed by the state’s Attorney General. In the next few months the campaign will begin gathering the requisite signatures to put the initiative before voters in the fall.

Tightening gun restrictions through traditional legislative channels has been a frustrating dead end for gun-control proponents. In the years since the mass school shooting in Newtown, Conn., far more laws have been passed to loosen gun regulations than to strengthen them. But the Safety for All Act bypasses the state legislature by going directly to voters. A similar tack worked in Washington state in 2014, when a ballot initiative to close that state’s gun show loophole passed with almost 60 percent of the vote.

Gun rights supporters essentially conceded that contest, contributing only $500,000 to fight the initiative in the face of at least $6 million in spending by Everytown for Gun Safety and other gun control groups. Proponents of the Safety for All Act say they are gearing up to spend more than that this time around.

The opposition is also planning a sizable, and expensive, fight in California. “Gavin Newsom seriously underestimated the fervor of opposition,” says Mark Selmi, a spokesman for Michel & Associates, the law firm that represents the National Rifle Association in California. “There will be a consolidated opposition, including a large number of county sheriffs and a record voter turnout.” Fundraising has already begun on Second Amendment social media accounts.

What the law says about buying guns online
What the law says about buying guns online

California has some of the nation’s strictest gun control laws, and the state is something of a bellwether for how far gun-control advocates can push before they are beaten back, in the courts or elsewhere. On the issue of regulating ammunition, gun-control proponents point to ordinances in Sacramento and Los Angeles that require ammunition sellers to maintain records of people who buy bullets and to make those records available to police. (Law enforcement has since begun to use the logs in investigations and prosecutions of those prohibited from owning bullets who bought them anyway.)

Gun rights advocates, meanwhile, point to a successful court challenge of a law that would have applied these provisions statewide.

A small group of gun-control advocates have, for years, been making the case that bullets are as good, if not better, a target for regulation than guns. Without bullets, they point out, a gun is a useless piece of metal. And unlike guns, bullets must continually be replaced. “If I buy a firearm, I take good care of it, it can last a lifetime,” says Garen Wintemute, an emergency physician and Director of the Violence Prevention Research Program at the University of California, Davis. “The larger share of the market is in the consumables, like ammunition.”

But this is a fledgling idea in a landscape where 37 states don’t require background checks to purchase a handgun — let alone a box of ammo. “In most states, we’re actually starting from even further behind,” says Ari Freilich of the Law Center to Prevent Gun Violence, a think tank that worked with Newsom to formulate the policy ideas in the Safety for All Act. “Before they can impose ammunition background checks, they also have to talk about firearms background checks as well.”

Four states and the District of Columbia require a license to buy ammunition, and getting that license requires passing a background check. But once you have the license, “you have it until it expires,” Freilich says. “There are processes to revoke the license, but generally speaking, it’s hard to do that.”

The proposed new system in California would require a background check at every purchase, and would draw on the database of prohibited purchasers, updated in real time, that the state already uses for gun sales.

In 2013, New York state passed the SAFE Act, a similar law that would have required ammunition buyers to pass a background check at the point of purchase. But unlike California, which has stricter rules than the federal government’s and maintains its own prohibited gun buyers database, New York relies on the federal background check system, known as NICS. Federal officials said the Brady Act — which established the system of firearm background checks — does not allow NICS to be used for bullets. The SAFE Act is now in limbo until the state police can develop its own statewide database. “New York does face administrative hurdles in putting a new, comprehensive background check database together,” Freilich says — “though I do believe political opposition has hindered the process.”

Feral Pigs ‘Rampage’ in Kirkuk, Killing 3 ISIS Militants

NEWS |

Feral Pigs ‘Rampage’ in Kirkuk, Killing 3 ISIS Militants

Hey Texas, still looking for something to do with all your feral pigs?

Reports from IraqiNews.com say three ISIS militants were killed late Sunday when a group of feral hogs attacked them in Kirkuk, near a farmland in al-Rashad.

Apparently, the men were trying to clear a large group of pigs from the farmland, when they suddenly went on a “rampage” and attacked the three militants. As you all know, these pigs have a relatively short temper, and they will charge if they feel threatened. That’s likely what happened here, and when the dust settled, all three of the militants were left killed.

To give you an idea of what a charging feral pig looks like, we included the video below, which shows five times a wild hog charged people that made us hold our breathe.

Video: 6 Steps to Properly Clean a Wild Turkey

Video: 6 Steps to Properly Clean a Wild Turkey

You can either skin or pluck a wild turkey, with a few variations in between. As the video below from our friends at Mossy Oak shows, one of the most common and easiest ways is to skin the turkey and then remove the meat in a way that it can easily be cooked to perfection.

Of course, before you get started, you’ll need a good sharp knife and a clean flat surface. It’s also helpful to have gallon-size freezer bags on hand, as well as a garbage bag to discard the carcass when finished.

Below are the six steps that can get that juicy turkey on the table in no time. And yes, you’ll also learn the easiest ways to remove the tail fan, beard and spurs so you can remember your bird for years to come.

Step 1, Remove the Beard: The beard can be pulled away from the breast and carefully cut away. After removing it, you’ll need to remove any excess tissue.

Steps 2, Remove the Spurs: Apply pressure to the turkey knee joint until the joint pops loose. Then, you should be able to easily separate the skin with a sharp knife.

Step 3, Remove the Fan: Hold on to the base of the tail and cut just below the lump of meat that holds the fan feathers together.

Step 4, Skin the Bird: Start by laying down the turkey breast side up. Make a small cut through the skin along the top of the breast bone. Slowly pull the skin away from the breast and legs.

Step 5, Remove the Breast Meat: Locate the breast bone and make a cut down one side of the bone to loosen the breast meat. Pull breast meat away from bone while cutting along the breast bone to remove in one piece. Repeat this process on the other side of the breast bone to remove the other breast.

Step 6, Remove the Leg and Thigh Meat: With the turkey placed on its back, apply pressure down on the thigh until you feel the joint pop loose. Run your knife between thigh and turkey body until the leg quarter releases from the body.

MEANWHILE, IN TEXAS . ..

MEANWHILE, IN TEXAS . ..

Poll Party
The second part of a Texas Lyceum poll, released Wednesday, reveals some trends in Texas that might seem troubling for Senator Ted Cruz and President Donald Trump. The survey shows Cruz is currently tied with his Democratic opponent Beto O’Rourke. The poll says that O’Rourke, a Democratic congressman from El Paso who announced his 2018 Senate race last month, is currently locked in a dead-heat with Cruz, which is pretty shocking even when you consider that the Lyceum polls always tend to skew left. Each registered 30 percent support, although 37 percent of respondents said they were undecided. Additionally, the majority of respondents surveyed said they do not approve of the job Trump is doing so far in the White House. Trump garnered just a 42 percent approval rating, while 54 percent of respondents disapproved of the president’s performance.

Bear Witness
Alex Jones, the controversial conspiracy theorist and host of Infowars, testified at his child custody trial in Travis County on Wednesday, insisting that his rants and raves are a reflection of his true self rather than acts of performance art, as his attorney had previously claimed. “I believe in the overall political program I am promoting of Americana and freedom,” Jones said on the stand according to the Austin American-Statesman, adding that anyone attempting to raise questions about his on-stage authenticity is “playing a trick on the public.” At stake is the custody of his three kids, ages nine, twelve, and fourteen. The attorney for his ex-wife has so far attempted to undermine Jones’s sanity and credibility as a father figure, using Jones’s erratic on-air and off-air behavior to paint him as unfit to be around his kids. Jones is in a tough spot at the moment—if he continues to say that his public persona is the true Alex Jones, it may ultimately cost him custody of his kids. If he denounces that persona as a fake public face, then he’ll risk losing his following. He’ll take the stand again on Thursday.

Mirror, Mirror
A recently released survey by Travel and Leisure lists Houston and San Antonio as among the prettiest cities in America. No, not architecture. People. According to the list, Houston is ranked number nine because it has a lot of malls and beautiful people love to shop. Also, as Travel and Leisure accurately notes, “Beyoncé is from Houston,” along with Patrick Swayze. San Antonio rounded out the list as the fifteenth most attractive city. Apparently Alamo City residents look pretty good in the lighting along the Riverwalk, but their personality shined brightest, as they earned a perfect score for being friendly. It’s great to see two Texas cities crack a list like this, but, uh, where does that leave Austin and Dallas? Austin certainly isn’t used to being cast as the ugly duckling, and Austinites are justifiably kinda salty about the snub. The Austin American-Statesman seemed particularly perturbed that its city was bested by Houston. “Beyoncé isn’t living there and Swayze, well, you won’t see him either,” the Statesman wrote in a rebuttal to the survey. “Perhaps… people just look better through a petrochemical haze. Or mosquito swarm.” So salty! And as the Dallas Morning News notes, the Big D likely found itself left off the list because it lays claim to the dubious distinction of being Travel and Leisure‘s eighth-rudest city in America. Maybe just take some time to work on yourself, Dallas.

Texas Lawmaker Wants to Legalize Hunting Feral Hogs from Hot Air Balloons

Texas Lawmaker Wants to Legalize Hunting Feral Hogs from Hot Air Balloons

Policymakers in Texas continue to scratch their heads over the state’s feral hog problem, and the solutions are getting weirder.


Researchers and policymakers for years have searched fruitlessly for effective ways to significantly drop feral hog population levels in Texas, with proposals ranging from eating our way out of the problem to widespread poisoning.

Roughly 2 million wild hogs are estimated to live in Texas, and they cause more than $50 million in damage each year. The invasive animals’ high breeding rate and lack of predators have fueled their proliferation in South, Central and East Texas, leading to big business for hunters and trappers.

In 2011, Agriculture Commissioner Sid Miller, then a state rep, passed what became known as the “pork chopper” bill, legalizing the hunting of feral hogs from a helicopter. On its face, the bill sounded more like a joke than an actual solution.


Hunter prepares to shoot feral hogs with a rifle from a helicopter.  YOUTUBE/NICK LEGHORN

Turns out, it’s really hard to shoot anything from a helicopter. In addition to being ineffective, the method is also very dangerous (and not just for the hogs.) The only results produced by the bill were some crazy YouTube videos and an industry in which people pay upwards of $3,000 per hunt to pick off pigs from a chopper.

Enter state Representative Mark Keough, a Republican and pastor from The Woodlands. He told the Observer that he “loved” Miller’s pork chopper bill and found himself asking: “What are more ways we can take more feral hogs?”

After chatting with hunters and conducting his own informal research, Keough believes he’s found an alternative solution: hot air balloons.

His House Bill 3535 would authorize Texans to hunt feral hogs and coyotes from a hot air balloon with a permit.

If the idea seems crazy, that’s because it is. No one hunts from a hot air balloon. Go ahead, Google it. “I haven’t found people anywhere doing this,” Keough admits.

But he thinks it would be pretty damn sweet to try. (It’s currently illegal, or he would’ve tried already, he said.)

The fast-moving helicopter approach, Keough says, has a lot of “safety issues,” leads to many misses and often scares off the hogs. “They’re smart,” he said.


Feral hogs damage land in rural areas, but have increasingly caused problems in suburban and urban areas.  U.S. FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE

Hot air balloons, on the other hand, are more stable, slower and offer a better rifle-shooting platform, Keough said.

Last July, 16 people were killed in the deadliest hot air balloon crash in U.S. history near Lockhart when the pilot lost control and crashed into power lines. The incident led to calls for stricter regulation of the balloon industry.

Still, Keough says, “It’s far safer than if you were hunting out of a helicopter.”

But more effective? Probably not.

Even Keough admits there’s a good chance hunters could spend all day in a balloon and not shoot anything. And its clumsy, slow-moving nature will keep hunters from effectively chasing the animals.

The animals, which can grow to weigh 100-400 pounds, have a gestation period that’s shorter than four months and litter sizes of up to 12. They are considered a non-game animal, meaning there are no seasons or bag limits, but a state hunting license is required.

Billy Higginbotham, a professor and wildlife and fisheries specialist with the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service, said the balloon strategy faces the same problem as helicopters in the eastern third of the state: trees.

“Aerial gunning by any vehicle [in East Texas] is not widely used because of the extensive tree cover,” Higginbotham said.


State Representative Mark Keough, R-The Woodlands.  FACEBOOK

Keough said the “pork choppper” bill “was more about creating an industry” and that no single strategy will significantly reduce hog populations.

“I think there is a possibility [with hot air balloons] for an industry, but the motivating factor is this is another way to get rid of the problem,” he said

Keough also sponsored legislation that would require more research on the effects of widespread lethal pesticides, including warfarin, before they can be used on hogs. The measure passed the House Monday.

A Texas Parks and Wildlife Department spokesperson declined to comment on pending legislation, citing agency policy. HB 3535 would require the agency to license individuals who want to hunt from the balloons.

Keough, who said he’s “interested in anything that will help us get rid of these things,” believes his bill represents the spirit of Texas.

“We’ve got a problem here, and we are willing to fix it ourself,” he said. “We have that Western, swashbuckling, cowboying type of way to deal with things. It’s part of the culture, it’s different than any other state.”

Correction: An earlier version of this story reported no license is required to hunt feral hogs in Texas. A state-issued license is required, although there are no seasons or bag limits.

Texas Parks & Wildlife tightens rules on deer breeders

Texas Parks & Wildlife tightens rules on deer breeders

 


The Texas Parks and Wildlife Commission adopted new rules to combat a disease found in deer, but the new rules could put a strain on many of the state’s 1,300 deer breeding businesses.

The commission’s vote came after months of discussions with interested groups, including breeders, ranch owners who sell hunting leases, environmental groups and livestock organizations.

The purpose for new regulations is to address how the state is going to deal with chronic wasting disease. The neurological condition — which affects deer, elk and maybe moose, but not humans — can cause weight loss, behavioral changes, brain lesions, excessive salivation, pneumonia, difficulty swallowing and head tremors.

It was discovered last year at a breeding facility in Medina County, near San Antonio.

With the commission’s unanimous vote on Monday, deer breeders will have to comply with increased regulation. There will be limited movement of breeder deer across the state, increased postmortem testing for chronic wasting disease and more live testing for the disease, too.

Deer breeding opponent Jenny Sanders, who is executive director of Texans for Saving our Hunting Heritage, called the commission vote a win.

Sanders, who also has served a manager on the 11,300-acre Temple Ranch near Freer in South Texas, said chronic wasting disease as a major threat to white-tailed deer in Texas and to the multibillion-dollar hunting industry. The state had the responsibility to protect the state’s 4 million white-tailed deer, she said.

Not everyone agreed with Sanders and the commissioners.

Particularly frustrated were few dozen members of Texas’ biggest deer breeding group, who walked out of a meeting before the vote even occurred.

Breeders involved with the Texas Deer Association said they believed the members of the commission had come to the meeting with their minds made up.

Marty Berry, a breeder from South Texas, said he felt like the commissioners didn’t care to hear from breeders.

“Nothing else can be accomplished at this level, “ he said.

Hugo Berlanga, a former member of the Texas House from Corpus Christi and owner of a deer breeding business, said the breeding industry in Texas is already on “life support.” The new regulations will come with high costs and will force some breeding operations of out business, he said.

“They have done so much damage to breeders,” he said.

Berlanga said the process was rigged to the benefit of large ranch owners who fear competition from smaller businesses that are often close to metro areas.

“It’s a bunch of elitists. I can’t explain it any simpler than that,” said Berlanga, a board member of the Texas Deer Association.

Sanders, whose group’s members include some representatives from major Texas ranches, has rejected the notion that the breeder fight is about large ranch owners trying to eliminate competition from breeders.

Rather, she said in a recent op-ed published in the San Antonio Express News, that “a small group of deer breeders” has “embarked on an effort to undermine” the efforts of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department.

Josh Havens, a spokesman for the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, said the commission has heard testimony from a number of individuals who either represent themselves, organizations and landowners.

“(T)his is a public resource issue, and the commission will make their decision based on science and what is in the best interest of the states wildlife and hunting heritage,” Havens wrote in a text message.

Berry, the South Texas breeder, said his and other breeders’ fight won’t end with the commission vote.

An already-filed lawsuit is going to be part of the answer, he said.

“That’s going to be the next step before the Legislature,” he said.

“Promoting Conservation through Commerce”

Exotic Wildlife Association
NEWS ALERT
“Promoting Conservation through Commerce”
Live on Facebook Tonight!
 
Tune in to the Alan Warren Show live on Facebook tonight! We will be discussing the scimitar horn oryx! We will share the live link on our EWA Facebook page and you can even post live comments and questions during the show! Don’t miss it!
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Exotic Wildlife Association
Charly Seale, Executive Director

105 Henderson Branch Rd., West
Ingram, Texas 78025
 
April 12, 2017
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This EWA E-Blast brought to you by:

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Alan Warren Outdoors Radio Show 


  

Exotic Wildlife Association, 105 Henderson Branch Rd., West, Ingram, TX 78025
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Fever Tick Updat

Exotic Wildlife Association
NEWS ALERT
“Promoting Conservation through Commerce”
Fever Tick Update
Exotic Wildlife Association
Charly Seale, Executive Director

105 Henderson Branch Rd., West
Ingram, Texas 78025
 
April 10, 2017
Like us on Facebook
This EWA E-Blast brought to you by:

Huntsville Livestock

Alan Warren Outdoors Radio Show 


  

Exotic Wildlife Association, 105 Henderson Branch Rd., West, Ingram, TX 78025
Sent by charly@myewa.org in collaboration with

Exotic Wildlife Association News Alert

Exotic Wildlife Association
NEWS ALERT
“Promoting Conservation through Commerce”
CALL TO ACTION
 
SUPPORT House Bill 2855 by Rep. Chris Paddie RE: Microchip ID for Captive Deer
We need your support and action TUESDAY! The House Committee on Culture, Recreation, and Tourism posted for public hearing NEXT TUESDAY, APRIL 11th on the following bill supported by the Exotic Wildlife Association.
House Bill 2855 by Rep. Chris Paddie
Relating to the identification of breeder deer by use of microchip implants.
The Committee will meet at the following time and location:
Date:               TUESDAY4/11/17
Time:              2:00pm or Adjournment of the House
Location:        Capitol Extension, Room E1.010
We need everyone’s SUPPORT. The Texas Wildlife Association and the Texas Foundation for Conservation are actively engaging their membership and other outdoor organizations to oppose this legislation without cause or merit. We need YOUR SUPPORT NOW!
Please plan to attend the public hearing next week to register your support for this bill.
Additionally, please email your state legislator and the Texas House members seated on the House Committee on Culture, Recreation, and Tourism to explain why you support this legislation. Talking points supporting this legislation are included below. We ask that you please include reasons why this issue is important to you and your family.
To Find Your State Legislator, Click HERE:
To Email the House Committee on Culture, Recreation, and Tourism Members, Click HERE:
– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –
SUBJECT: Support for House Bill 2855 (Microchip ID in Deer)
Dear Representative:
I am writing in support of House Bill 2855, which would allow deer breeding facilities to utilize USDA approved 840 Series Microchips as an acceptable form of identification for breeder deer held under TPWD permit. We would like to thank you for your support on this most important issue.
House Bill 2855 would allow deer breeding facilities to utilize USDA approved 840 Series Microchips as an acceptable form of identification for breeder deer held under TPWD permit. Microchip ID technology serves as the gold-standard for animal identification worldwide. Humane societies, veterinary clinics, scholastic research facilities, and international animal transportation regulations utilize microchips for permanent identification in many species of animals. The technology is widely available and the procedure for application is fast, safe, and appears to be relatively pain-free in most animals. However, the current Texas statute does not recognize microchip technology as a form of accepted identification under the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department permit issued for breeder deer.
The Committee Substitute for House Bill 2855 would simply allow a breeder the OPTION of utilizing a USDA-approved microchip or a tag for the identification of deer while in a breeding facility. The application of this technology would vastly improve the traceability and identification of permitted animal movement in captive deer. Furthermore, this legislation would recognize the continued, existing use of the tattoo on released animals to ensure hunters across the state are able to easily ID an animal born in a captive facility.
The current Texas statute falls well short of the technological advancement in identification technology. Millions of microchips are utilized in the United States to identify a wide variety of animals – including white-tailed deer in most states that allow captive farming. Microchip technology is accepted and endorsed by the United States Department of Agriculture through its Herd Certification Program across the United States. The American Veterinary Medical Association also recommends certified microchips for all species.
We thank you for your support of House Bill 2855 by Rep. Chris Paddie. This important legislation would allow for the best available identification technology to be utilized as an accepted form of identification for breeder deer held under TPWD permit.
Exotic Wildlife Association
Charly Seale, Executive Director

105 Henderson Branch Rd., West
Ingram, Texas 78025

13-Year-Old Girl Tags Two Monster Red Stags – Then Receives Death Threats

NEWS |

13-Year-Old Girl Tags Two Monster Red Stags – Then Receives Death Threats

Aryanna Gourdin, a 13-year-old from Cove, Utah, recently traveled with her father, Eli, and her brother, Jacob, to New Zealand to hunt red stag. She successfully pulled-off the challenge and tagged two mature stags on consecutive days (stag No. 1 shown above). The second stag (below) scored 404 inches! Aryanna went on the hunt with outfitter Kaweka Hunting New Zealand.

The video below of Aryanna and her second stag received over 110,000 views on Facebook. Kendall Jones even shared the hunt on her Facebook page, which has more than 1 million followers.

Aryanna has always loved the art of hunting and has many stories to tell.

For example, back in August, Aryanna and her father went on a hunting trip to Africa. During this adventure, she legally tagged a zebra and giraffe. Aryanna decided to post a picture her harvest on Facebook, but anti-hunters spotted the post and she received many hate messages – and even death threats. In total, she received more than 75,000 negative comments on her Facebook post, and was called “sick” and an “animal hater.”

Undaunted, Aryanna has not recanted her hunting lifestyle. She simply has replied kindly and softly to this situation saying, “I will never back down from hunting, because I am a hunter!”

And Aryanna isn’t fighting the negativity alone. Many outdoorsmen and supporters of Aryanna have stated, “Let the haters hate. Hunt away, Aryanna!”

Editor’s note: Aryanna continues pursuing her love for the outdoors. She is now a co-host on The Outdoorsman’s Art Radio Show alongside with her father, Eli, and the author. She also recently contributed to writing a book regarding hunting rights and anti-hunting activism entitled “The Hunter’s War: Vegan Vs. Hunters,” which is available online. She will never back down from being a hunter.

ANIMAL CAPTURE AND RESTRAINT | CHEMICAL IMMOBILIZATION

ANIMAL CAPTURE AND RESTRAINT | CHEMICAL IMMOBILIZATION

In the preceding entries you learned about capture and handling techniques that don’t require drugs.  So, what’s the deal, why do we even need chemical immobilization? Well, we use it mostly for safety, both the animal’s and care giver’s, and often it is needed just to get near an animal.  Big pastures are awesome. Lots of space allows our hoofstock species to do normal things, like they would in the wild. But when the vets need to examine a patient with their hands on it, say to suture a wound or help with a difficult delivery of a calf, or an animal needs to be transported to another area or zoo, we often have to use remote delivery of immobilization drugs to tranquilize the animal safely.

A number of different types of darting systems are available, but most incorporate a projectile dart that is shot from a special gun.  On impact the dart injects the prepared dose of drugs via gas pressure or a gunpowder charge.  Fossil Rim Wildlife Center routinely uses three types of remote delivery systems, including a rifle with gunpowder fired and gunpowder charged metal darts (as shown in Image 1), a CO2 powered pistol with plastic air charged darts (as shown in Images 2 and 3), and a good old fashioned blowpipe with plastic air charged darts.

DSC04730

Image 1: Rifle with gunpowder fired and gunpowder charged metal darts

DSC04758

Image 2: CO2 powered pistol with plastic air charged darts

Darting Grant's Zebras

Image 3: CO2 powered pistol with plastic air charged darts

Another fantastic tool used for closer range delivery of immobilizing drugs, antibiotics or vaccines, is a spring loaded pole syringe (image below). Its use requires the animal to be within about 6 feet of the person administering the drugs.

Using the pole syringe to deliver additional reversal agent to an addax.

Spring loaded pole syringe

DSC03969

Vet wearing face shield while loading drugs into dart.

DSC03956

Dart Box

Each situation requiring the use of chemical immobilization is considered in light of what technique will provide the safest and most effective delivery of the drugs. For example, the majority of the hoofstock species require darting at long range (up to 50 meters), and therefore the rifle is most appropriate.

Chemical Capture of a Roan Antelope

DSCF3209

Driving sedated addra gazelle to a holding pen.

For smaller bodied animals like cheetah, coatis, and wolves, blow darting is the best technique, as it causes very little dart associated trauma and these species are conditioned to come into smaller areas so they don’t require the long range capability of the dart gun. Cheetah also tolerate the pole syringe well, and when used appropriately, is more consistent than the blow pipe. The CO2 pistol is used in the smaller enclosures where ranges are shorter and with the giraffe since they are usually accustomed to coming up closer than some of the other hoofstock species. Additionally, the pistol accommodates very large darts, needed for the large drug volume used for giraffe.

IMG_5256

Providing supplemental oxygen during a giraffe immobilization

Rhinos are typically trained to perform several behaviors, including the presentation of a forelimb. In this case, a rhino can usually be hand injected, just like a person getting an injection from their doctor, but sometimes may require pole syringing or darting if they are not conditioned or are apprehensive.

Kusamona melanoma surgery 6Apr07

Black rhino presenting forelimb; vet and curator preparing to hand inject sedation drugs.

Emmet AH duplicate

White rhino immobilization; we blindfold rhinos and use ear muffs to reduce external stimuli.

No chemical immobilization is taken lightly, due to the possibility of complications that could include physical injury during the induction or recovery period or physiological complications from the drugs themselves. For example, the veterinarians may decide to monitor a lameness in an animal like a giraffe for a few days instead of immobilizing it right away for diagnostics. Giraffe are large animals with unique physiology (like really high blood pressure at the level of their heart) that can change significantly when drugged and lying on their side. Special animals require special preparation and handling. For example, during a giraffe immobilization the neck and head are stretched out on a padded board or ladder that is tilted on an angle to the tailgate of a truck. This serves two purposes: it helps to keep the neck muscles from kinking or cramping, which can be life threatening, and helps maintain adequate blood pressure to the kidneys by keeping a large volume of blood from pooling in the long jugular veins of the neck.

Nettie hoof procedure

Giraffe immobilization; neck is stretched out on padded board.

Nettie Hoof Trim Giraffe (5)-CAP duplicate

Giraffe hoof trim

Special animals also require special drugs. To deliver an appropriate dose to a large, cantankerous animal remotely, we need something that is potent and of small volume. Ideally, the drug would also take effect very quickly, stopping the animal before running out of sight, and it would also be reversible. The class of drugs that fits this most closely is the ultra-potent opioids. They act fast to induce anesthesia and also give pain control (important for surgical procedures) and, perhaps coolest of all, they are completely reversible with the administration of the antidote (also called the reversal drug or antagonist). So, once the procedure is done, we give the opioid antagonist and within a few minutes the animal is standing and often ready to assimilate back into its herd, able to interact normally with other animals.

DSCF0194

Loading Grant’s zebra onto stretcher and then into trailer.

Fossil Rim’s animal care and animal health staff have extensive experience with the chemical immobilization of many species. Sometimes we are asked to help at other zoos that may never have had to immobilize something as tricky as a giraffe. Performing around 150-200 chemical immobilization procedures a year means we are always gaining experience and honing our skills, but, still, nobody likes a giraffe immobilization!

By: Holly Haefele (Veterinarian and Director of Animal Health)

Urgent Info from Newport Labs

Urgent Info from Newport Labs
In order to continue offering the cervid industry vaccines as we have in the past, we need your help.  Newport Laboratories is asking for your assistance by submitting affected tissues to their lab for a diagnostic workup.  Submissions of fresh spleen, lung, intestine, fecal samples/swabs, jaw swabs, foot swabs.

For your convenience we have attached the diagnostic submission form to be used when submitting your samples to the diagnostic lab.  When completing the diagnostic form please be sure to include your attending veterinarians information. Please note that all results and diagnostic charges will be sent to your veterinarian.

Newport Laboratories also provides free diagnostic kits for sample submission. Call 1-800-220-2522 to request a free diagnostic shipper.

Deer Breeders Corp. | 972.289.3100 | info@dbcDeer.com | www.dbcDeer.com

Legislative Update!

Exotic Wildlife Association
NEWS ALERT
“Promoting Conservation through Commerce”
Legislative Update!
 
Animal Cruelty
HB 748 by Farrar authorizing a municipality with over 700,000 people to impose on a person charged with animal cruelty to pay all costs and attorney fees. The bill is pending in committee. EWA opposed the bill.
HB 749 by Farrar would develop an animal abuser database similar to a sexual abuser database, was supposed to be heard March 20, but was withdrawn. EWA opposes the bill.
Weapons
SB 16 by Nichols would have eliminated all fees for applying or renewing the license to carry a handgun. However, due to the high fiscal note in such a hard fiscal year, the CSSB 16 has been amended to reduce all the fees to $40. It passed out of committee. EWA supported the bill.
SB 263 By Perry relating to the handgun removing the caliber requirement to obtain or renew a license to carry a handgun, was voted out of committee without amendments. EWA supported the bill.
HB 375 by Stickland | et al. Relating to providing for the carrying of handguns without a license and to related offenses and penalties. EWA supports the bill.
HB 1911 by White et al. relating to granting authority to carry a firearm to an unlicensed person who otherwise meets certain requirements for a handgun license and to related criminal offenses; creating a criminal offense. EWA supports the bill.
Exotic Wildlife Association
Charly Seale, Executive Director

105 Henderson Branch Rd., West
Ingram, Texas 78025
 
March 30, 2017
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Alan Warren Outdoors Radio Show 


  

Exotic Wildlife Association, 105 Henderson Branch Rd., West, Ingram, TX 78025
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Constant Contact

ACTION ALERT! EWA Requesting Members Comment Now in Opposition to USDA AMS’ COOL Changes

Exotic Wildlife Association
NEWS ALERT
“Promoting Conservation through Commerce”
ACTION ALERT!
EWA Requesting Members Comment Now in Opposition to USDA AMS’ COOL Changes
Comment Period Ends April 13th!
 
The Exotic Wildlife Association joins other associations in opposition to the USDA Agriculture Marketing Service (AMS)’s proposed changes to the Country of Origin Labeling (COOL) program for venison. This includes all of our deer and elk ranchers. COOL is a labeling program that requires retailers, such as grocery stores, convenience stores and farmer’s markets, to provide extra labeling noting the country of origin.  This change originates from the 2014 Farm Bill. USDA AMS’ proposed rule estimates this mandate will cost the industry nearly $1 million to comply with little or no economic benefit.
Even more appalling, is the USDA AMS’ definition of cervid and venison includes antelope and nilgai. Nilgai and antelope are not deer and this is not helping the argument to distance antelope and blackbuck from cervid rules, such as CWD.
Please submit a comment in opposition for one of these two methods: 
You may submit comments by either of the following methods:
* Federal Rulemaking Portal: Go to: https://www.regulations.gov/docket?D=AMS-LPS-16-0014
* Postal Mail/Commercial Delivery: Comments may also be submitted to Julie Henderson, Director, COOL Division, Livestock, Poultry, and Seed Program, Agricultural Marketing Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA); STOP 0216; 1400 Independence Avenue S.W., Room 2620-S; Washington, DC 20250-0216. All comments should reference docket number AMS-LPS-16-0014.
Exotic Wildlife Association
Charly Seale, Executive Director

105 Henderson Branch Rd., West
Ingram, Texas 78025
 
March 29, 2017
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This EWA E-Blast brought to you by:

Huntsville Livestock

Alan Warren Outdoors Radio Show 


  

Exotic Wildlife Association, 105 Henderson Branch Rd., West, Ingram, TX 78025

Proven Tips for Prespawn Bass

HOW TO |

Proven Tips for Prespawn Bass

While some anglers in the South and Southeast have already lived through, and hopefully survived, the excitement of targeting prespawn largemouths this year, a great many more are experiencing the thrill right now – or they’re gnawing down their fingernails while awaiting its arrival.

During the prespawn period, when water temps climb into the high 40s to mid 50s, most bass in a body of water will move shallow – say, 15 feet or less – having left their deep winter haunts to forage in the warmer water. For anglers, it’s a great opportunity to encounter lots of aggressive fish, and a real chance at catching a trophy-class bass.

The backs of creek arms and the tops of main points are prime spots to find prespawn largemouths as they attempt to gorge before transitioning into spawning mode. Here, a shallow-diving crankbait, such as a Rapala Fat Rap (below), is an optimal lure choice. Its relatively shallow dive curve (7 feet) and tight swimming action are the ideal combination for early season largemouths on the prowl. What’s more, this type of lure allows an angler to cover a lot of water in a short span of time.

Structures that act as a buffer between the main lake and a backwater bay where fish are likely to spawn are also prespawn hotspots. Whether it’s a breakwall, a series of bridge columns or even a culvert, it’s prime territory spot for working a crank. This might require going with a bait that runs even shallower, though – something like Strike King’s KVD 1.5 Shallow (below), which dives to 3 feet on the retrieve. Its flatter sides provide an erratic thumping action that attracts attention from long distances. It’s also a good choice when action on the flats heats up.

In fact, shallow grass- or stump-filled flats between points, or those extending shoreward from a channel edge can be loaded with fish when weather and water conditions are right. Bass often cruise in search of forage, or may even be on the lookout for potential spawning sites. Either way, a lipless rattlebait ripping through weeds or careening off a stump triggers strikes, even in water colder than 50 degrees.

Generally, bass on the flats are constantly in motion – moving targets, so to speak. The advantage a lipless crank brings to the table is that an angler, fancasting while on a slow troll with the bow-mount, can cover a lot of real estate. The lure’s tight shimmy and endless rattle also call to fish from a distance, making it a smart choice in this situation.

When these bass go on a feeding tear, a lure like Cabela’s Lipless Sidekick (below) might offer an additional benefit. Besides the rattle and strike-triggering action, the lure features a small blade attached to each side, giving the illusion that there’s more than one baitfish within range. When bass are hungry, an easy “twofer” is darn appealing.

Remember, too, that bass are moving from deep to shallow during the prespawn, so don’t neglect to check their migration routes – usually a ditch or some type of depression. But the fish could also use a line of brush, or even a fence line that runs into deep water, as cover during their travels. There are a number of ways to attack migration routes – casting a crank or spinnerbait, or hopping a jig, for instance. Slow-rolling a swimbait, though, is often a better option.

A lure like the Zoom Swimmin’ Super Fluke (below) presents an authentic baitfish profile, plus its hard-thumping paddle tail produces vibrations predators can’t ignore. Rigged on a swim-head jig or a weighted swimbait hook, this type of lure can swim close to bottom all the way down the route.

Rip-rap or a submerged rockpile that harbors crayfish just emerging from hibernation are magnets for early season bass as well. Here, a crawdad-colored crank or rattlebait, or a spinnerbait, might produce well. But a soft-plastic craw on a jig is another excellent option. Swim-hop a lure like YUM’s Christie Craw (below) over and through rip-rap, making sure to pause for a few seconds if it settles on a chunk. A bass could strike then and there, but will more likely attack the instant the lure begins to scoot away. Do the same in rocks, whether they form an isolated pile or are part of a larger structure. Or, rig it on a football-style jig head and crawl it through the rubble.

Whether the bass in your area are in full prespawn mode, or you’re waiting for the magic to happen, probe these high-profile areas with the presentations outlined here, and reap the reward that only the early season can offer. Good luck fishing!

 

Best Handgun Ammo for Shooting Snakes

HOW TO |

Best Handgun Ammo for Shooting Snakes

Within these three types there are over 40 variations, and at least one is found in every state, with the exception of Alaska and Hawaii. Any serious survivalist should know how to identify venomous snakes, kill them, and treat their bites.


Snakes might not be as deadly as some other critters, but they are probably more feared.

About 7,000 venomous snakebites are reported each year in the United States. If bitten, you have a 99 percent or better chance of survival. This is probably because about 50 percent of the bites are dry, meaning no venom was injected. Good news, but if you’re bitten, then you’ll be thinking about that 1 percent instead of the 99.

Unfortunately, there is no first-aid protocol for snake bites that everyone agrees on completely, but if bitten you should do the one thing that is the hardest to do, and that is remain calm.

Of course, the best thing to do is not get bit, and while many people offer the advice of leave the snake alone and it will leave you alone, I tend to look at it from this standpoint: If I leave the snake alone today, it might bite me or someone else tomorrow.

In other words, if I see a poisonous snake, I kill it. (Note: In some locations, snakes are considered a protected species.)


Snakes are killed with tools more often than firearms, but a firearm is safer because you don’t have to get as close.

Shovels, rakes, sticks and knives aren’t proper snake-killing utensils, though those tools have probably killed more snakes than anything else. Arguments exist about exactly how far a snake can strike. Some say one-third of their body length, some say half, and some say two-thirds. I’m not sure why anyone cares because it is foolish to get that close to any venomous snake. Forget the shovel!

Like with most dangerous critters, a gun is generally the best solution because it allows you to keep your distance and still deliver a deathblow. Of course, the problem with snakes is that they are not large targets. The other problem is that by being a reptile, even a serious injury to their body will not prevent them from biting. The best way to kill a poisonous snake is to destroy its head.

Trying to kill a snake with a single bullet to the head can be problematic, particularly if the snake isn’t holding perfectly still. Even if a hit is obtained, expect the snake to go into a withering dance while trying to bite anything – including itself – within range. And this is where it gets really complicated: If you get a single bullet hit on a snake anywhere on its body, you’ll be lucky if you can get a second hit anywhere due to the wild wiggling that will follow.


The author’s preferred snake medicine is a shot to the head from a CCI shotshell. In all centerfire handgun cartridges offerings, they are snake capable out to about 10 feet.

The problem with a shotgun for snake defense is that due to its size, you may not always have a shotgun with you. The shotshell pistol loads from CCI have proven very effective on snakes, which is why most every Gunsite Academy instructor carries a spare magazine loaded with these specialty rounds. (Gunsite is in Arizona, where they have the especially hideous version of the Mojave rattler.)

I’ve tested the CCI pistol shotshells for every cartridge offered, and while results will vary, cartridge to cartridge and gun to gun, out to about 10 feet they are all snake capable. (I once killed a skunk at about 6 feet with the CCI .45 ACP shotshell.) CCI also makes shotshells for the .22 LR and the .22 Magnum, and while they might stop a snake, I’d be hesitant to recommend them.

I use the Three-S rule when it comes to poisonous snakes:

  1. See it first.
  2. Stay away.
  3. Shoot it dead.

Follow that advice and you won’t have to worry about proper first-aid treatment.