7 POST-SEASON TASKS FOR DEER HUNTERS

AG Slider Temp 7 post season jobs

JOSH HONEYCUTT

Just because deer season is over doesn’t mean there is nothing to do. In fact, there is much more to do after the season closes than during it. Preparing for next season starts now.

1. TAKE INVENTORY

The first task is seeing what bucks made it through the season. Odds are those that do will live to see next season. Knowing which bucks those are provides a huge advantage going into next fall. And remember, take inventory before you do all of these other tasks. You don’t want to risk pushing deer out before laying eyes on them.

2. RETAIN DEER

Year-round mineral helps retain deer. Feeding corn through the winter does, too. It can get expensive, but the benefits are great if you can justify the funds. I don’t do this every year. But when I take the post-season inventory, and I see bucks I really want to hunt next season, I feed them. Ironically, every year that I have, those same bucks stayed there and spent the following fall on that piece of ground. Deer become loyal to areas that provide their basic needs.

3. SCOUT AGAIN

I scout the places I hunt again after the season closes. Comparing old trails to new trails, old rut sign to new rut sign, and other important factors greatly increases my knowledge and understanding of deer. Plus, it helps to become more in tune with the land around me.

4. PULL TREESTANDS

It’s important to pull treestands down every winter. Leaving them out all of the time will greatly reduce their quality. It compromises structure and safety. Pull down treestands, inspect, and repair as needed. If for now other reason, pull them down to keep the strap from growing into the trees.

5. LEARN THE LAND

It doesn’t matter how long you hunt somewhere; you can always be better acquainted with the land. I always learn when I conduct post-season scouting.

6. LAND IMPROVEMENTS

I’m an advocate for getting major jobs out of the way in late winter and early spring. I don’t like putting pressure on deer in late spring and summer. It pressures deer and can push them out of the area before the next season even begins. Don’t let these jobs become preseason jobs instead.

7. REVIEW AND REFLECT

Look back on the deer season. Think about lessons learned. Flip through trail camera photos and compare them to weather patterns and moon phases from those days. Just try to learn something new that you can apply to your strategies next season.