Thursday Funny!

Image result for hunting cartoons

Fever Tick Report

Exotic Wildlife Association
NEWS ALERT
“Promoting Conservation through Commerce”
Fever Tick Report
 
 
.
Exotic Wildlife Association
Charly Seale, Executive Director

105 Henderson Branch Rd., West
Ingram, Texas 78025
 
February 14, 2017
Like us on Facebook
This EWA E-Blast brought to you by:

Huntsville Livestock

Alan Warren Outdoors Radio Show 

Friday Funny!

Image result for funny winter cartoon images

Aerial Wildlife Management (AWM) Permit Holder Update

Exotic Wildlife Association
NEWS ALERT
“Promoting Conservation through Commerce”
Aerial Wildlife Management (AWM) Permit Holder Update
Dear Aerial Wildlife Management (AWM) Permit Holder,
This message is intended to address some of the most common questions and concerns received since the launch of the new AWM online permitting system on January 4, 2017.
1.It is not necessary to add a map to all existing LOAs in TWIMS by March 31, 2017. The only existing LOAs that need to include an approved map by March 31, 2017 are those that are used between January 4, 2017 and March 31, 2017. After March 31, 2017, maps for other existing LOAs do not have to be placed on file with landowner approval until just prior to conducting activities on that property (similar to new LOAs). If an existing LOA is never used again, a map does not need to be placed on file.
2.If you are having difficulty operating TWIMS or have questions about functions, the help manual is available here, or by clicking the “Help” link in the top right corner of the TWIMS website. Please refer to this manual as your first stop for questions about operating the new system. If you have a question or encounter a problem that is not addressed in the manual, please contact the Wildlife Permits Office.
3.We have received several requests to allow for upload of existing map files from other GIS programs. This is not a capability of the system currently, but we are working with our developers to explore this as a possible enhancement in the future.
4.If you do not see an existing LOA in the system, that is because it was not included on any quarterly reports submitted to TPWD within the last three years. In order to conduct AWM activities on a property for which you do not find an LOA in TWIMS, all required information must first be entered as a new LOA request and approved by the landowner or landowner’s agent.
For technical assistance with the website, please refer to the help manual referenced above. For further assistance, please contact the Wildlife Permits Office at 512-389-4584 or awm.permit@tpwd.texas.gov.
Exotic Wildlife Association
Charly Seale, Executive Director

105 Henderson Branch Rd., West
Ingram, Texas 78025

WOW!!!! Get logged in to Wildlifebuyer right now! Over 40 auctions ending today!

WOW!!!! Get logged in to Wildlifebuyer right now! Over 40 auctions ending today!
View this email in your browser
We have some outstanding auctions closing today at 1 pm! Yes you read it right….. We have 40 auctions ending! Get logged in and check it out!!!! Wildlifebuyer is the #1 online auction site to buy and sell animals!

Be sure to check out the gorgeous Axis Bucks!

If you have questions selling or buying on Wildlifebuyer be sure to call the office and talk to one of our helpful associates!

Have a wonderful week!

~WLB Staff

Irish baroness calls out ‘pro-life’ US citizens who oppose gun control

Irish baroness calls out ‘pro-life’ US citizens who oppose gun control

  • Baroness Nuala O’Loan, former police ombudsman for Northern Ireland, and her husband, Declan O’Loan (Sarah Mac Donald)

The former police ombudsman for Northern Ireland has hit out at those in the U.S. who profess to be pro-life and yet vote for candidates opposed to gun controls.

Baroness Nuala O’Loan, a Catholic peer in the British House of Commons, told NCR she was concerned by the number of multiple killings in the U.S. “facilitated by the easy access to guns.”

Gun violence in
America in 2016
55, 719
Total number of incidents involving guns
14,404
Number of deaths by guns
29,498
Number of injuries by guns
Source: Gun Violence Archive as of Dec. 20, 2016

“If you believe in the sanctity of life, you do nothing which would imperil it and that includes not voting to sustain American gun laws,” she said.

Recalling her role as police ombudsman for Northern Ireland between 1999 and 2007, she explained that she had seen the consequences of violence and guns in the Troubles. That 30-year conflict in Northern Ireland resulted in 3,489 deaths and drew to a close in 1998 when the Good Friday Agreement secured an agreement between Nationalists and Unionists to work together in a power-sharing arrangement.

“I have investigated a lot of shootings and situations where people have been shot dead,” said O’Loan, who is part of the independent panel monitoring the Police Service of Northern Ireland investigations of Ulster Volunteer Force murders during the Troubles.

Challenging advocates of the U.S. Second Amendment, she commented, “You have to ask what are people hoping to achieve and why they would want to take up arms in the way some Americans do and are permitted to lawfully. Look at the number of multiple killings which are facilitated by the easy access to guns.”

She added, “If you believe life is a gift from God, and that every single one of us was formed by him and known by him, then you cannot take up arms, as there is the possibility that you may end up in a situation in which somebody else dies.”

During a keynote address at an international conference in June on “The Role of Church in a Pluralist Society: Good Riddance or Good Influence,” hosted by the Loyola Institute in Trinity College Dublin, O’Loan revealed that some members of the International Catholic Legislators Network had reported her to a senior cardinal in the Vatican a few years ago.

 

It’s Official: New World-Record Elk Taken in Montana

It’s Official: New World-Record Elk Taken in Montana

New World's Record Elk

Coming just days after a new whitetail world record was announced, the Boone and Crockett Club and Pope and Young Club announced that a bull from Montana taken on public land during the 2016 bow season would become the new archery world record American elk.

After the mandatory 60-day drying period ended, the massive elk antlers upheld all the hype. The elk’s official entry score was confirmed at an astounding 430 inches. In comparison, the current B&C world record taken with a rifle scores 442-5/8 inches.

The bull was taken back in September by Steve Felix, who is a resident of Montana and shot the elk while on a solo bowhunt early in the Montana archery season.

“History was made right here in Montana,” said Justin Spring, Boone and Crockett Club’s director of Big Game Records. This is the fourth-largest bull in our records, which date back to before 1900, the largest since 1968, and the largest from the state of Montana.”

The last step in the process, in order to obtain an official score for Pope and Young Club world record status, is to have the antlers panel scored by a group of highly qualified P&Y and B&C measurers. This will take place just prior to Pope and Young Club’s Biennial Convention and Big Game Awards Ceremony April 5-8, 2017, in St. Louis, Missouri, where this exceptional animal will be displayed and honored.

This big Montana bull will hurdle over the current archery world record elk, which scored 412-1/8 inches, and was taken in Arizona in 2005.

“We’re excited, not only for the health of our elk populations and bowhunting, but to be able to share this outstanding specimen with the public for the first time at our biennial convention,” explained Joe Bell, executive director for the Pope and Young Club.

Both organizations point to the fact that a free-ranging elk of this size, living a long life on good habitat, is just one more indicator that wildlife conservation and management is working well.

World Record Elk

Image courtesy Boone and Crockett Club

Tuesday Funny!

Image result for hunting cartoons

Come Celebrate EWA’s 50th!

Exotic Wildlife Association
NEWS ALERT
“Promoting Conservation through Commerce”
Come Celebrate EWA’s 50th! 
Save the Date!

 

 

 

Please mark you calendars and save the date for the Exotic Wildlife Association’s celebration of 50 years promoting conservation through commerce.  Join your friends and fellow exotic and whitetail breeders March 2-5, 2017 at the YO Ranch Resort Hotel and Conference Center for a tremendous weekend full of great and entertaining activities.
For those who have always wanted to take the License to Carry course your association will offer this course for our members on Thursday, March 2beginning at 9:00 a.m. In Kerrville. The cost of the course is $80.00 dollars and will be limited to the first 100 registrants. All you need is your weapon, holster and 50 rounds of ammunition for the qualification course.
The membership meeting packets will be arriving in your mailbox next week so take advantage of the early bird registration price.
For more information on the annual membership meeting, the License to Carry course, sponsorship opportunities or to reserve a booth, contact the EWA office at 830-367-7761.

 

 

 

Exotic Wildlife Association
Charly Seale, Executive Director

105 Henderson Branch Rd., West
Ingram, Texas 78025

Friday Funny!

Image result for hunting cartoons

Monday Funny!

Image result for turkey hunting cartoons

Our Mission – Animal Rights

Our Mission

The Nonhuman Rights Project (NhRP) is the only organization working through the common law to achieve actual LEGAL rights for members of species other than our own. Our mission is to change the common law status of at least some nonhuman animals from mere “things,” which lack the capacity to possess any legal right, to “persons,” who possess such fundamental rights as bodily integrity and bodily liberty, and those other legal rights to which evolving standards of morality, scientific discovery, and human experience entitle them.



Chimpanzees like Kiko (photographed here) are self-aware beings. But the law still considers them to be property – a “thing.” As such, buy metronidazole single dose chimpanzees in experimentation laboratories, zoos, circuses, and private homes have no legal rights. And the horrendous way they’re being treated is quite legal.


And while the Supreme Court has ruled that even corporations are entitled to certain legal rights, chimpanzees, elephants, dolphins, and whales have no more rights than a pair of tennis shoes.


The NhRP is setting out to change all of that. While there are many “animal rights” organizations, to this day, no one has ever demanded a legal right for a nonhuman animal using the common law. So please sign up to receive more information and learn how you can help.

Popular African PH dies

Popular African PH dies

Photo by Lili Sams

Herman Coetzee, a professional big game hunter with ties to Texas, died suddenly in Africa this month near his home.

Coetzee, 35, was found dead Oct. 21 at Avis Dam in Klein Windhoek, Namibia. According to Namibian media reports, he died from a self-inflicted gunshot wound with a hunting rifle.

He was born in the Limpopo Province of South Africa, growing up in the Bushveld region. Coetzee knew his calling from an early age, according to online sources. When he was 9, Coetzee told his teacher he wanted become a big game hunter – which he did. He was a highly experienced and qualified professional, who hunted big game for nearly half his life. At 16 he completed his professional hunting course and started guiding clients on Safari in Zimbabwe, South Africa, Botswana and Namibia. He worked for Thormahlen & Cochran Safaris from 2006-2012. He joined Chapungu-Kambako Safaris of Namibia in December 2014.

Anso Thormahlen said her former employee guided many successful safaris in South Africa – and had accompanied her daughter, Liane, on a leopard hunt. “It is with great sadness that we learned of the sudden passing of our former professional hunter, Herman Coetzee.”

Over the years, he touched the lives of hunters from all over the world, including Texas. David J. Sams, CEO of Lone Star Outdoor News, said Coetzee’s influenced several Texas hunters including his own daughter Lili, whom he guided on her first safari.

“He treated Lili like she was his own daughter and taught her the ways of safari hunting. He made a real hunter out of Lili on that trip. We can never forget the laughs and stories he told us. Lili looked up to him with great respect and admiration. We were truly blessed to have had Herman as our first professional hunter,” Sams said.

Coetzee is survived by his wife, Jeanetta Johnston, and a 1-year-old daughter.

1.0 ELAND

Listing Image

1.0 ELAND…..GET YOUR BIDS IN NOW AT WILDLIFEBUYER.COM!  AUCTION ENDS TODAY AT 1:00 P.M.!

 

Rescuing Arwa and Brice: The toughest 24 hours of my life

Surviving an ISIS attack03:22

Rescuing Arwa and Brice: The toughest 24 hours of my life

Updated 9:45 AM ET, Mon November 14, 2016

It was about 2 p.m. on the first Friday in November, and I was on the outskirts of the Iraqi city of Mosul, calling our senior producer back in Irbil to see if our team reporting from the front lines of the Battle for Mosul had checked in.
Hours earlier, I’d said goodbye to my colleagues and friends, CNN senior international correspondent Arwa Damon and photojournalist Brice Laine, as they climbed into an armored vehicle with Iraqi special forces. I’d grabbed both of them before they left.
“Guys, be very careful,” I’d said. “God be with you. I’ll be waiting for you out here.”
Arwa Damon and Brice Laine traveled to Mosul inside this armored MRAP with the Salahuddin regiment.

Normally, I’d have gone with them, but the army could only spare two seats for this mission. The soldiers, part of the Salahuddin regiment, would need every gun they could carry.
The MRAP carrying Arwa and Brice was part of a convoy of more than 35 armored vehicles preparing to make the perilous drive into ISIS-held territory east of Mosul, as part of the massive operation to retake the city.
The push began around 7 a.m. Armored Humvees crossed the long berm separating newly-liberated areas from ISIS-occupied lands, firing artillery shells and heavy machine guns as they went. A second convoy from another regiment, call-sign Kirkuk, followed them in.
The Kirkuk regiment of the Iraqi counter-terrorism forces moves into the eastern outskirts of Mosul.

More than two hours since they had vanished from sight, the sound of artillery shelling and heavy gunfire from the Iraqi forces hadn’t stopped. ISIS militants were firing sporadic barrages of mortars that landed on empty land about 500 meters from where I and the rest of the team stood, on the roof of the Iraqi army unit HQ.
Phone communications were terrible; the network was overloaded, making it difficult to get through.
Suddenly, around 1 p.m., a number of armored Humvees appeared, most of them damaged, heading back towards our direction from the front line.

Ambush, retreat

As I rushed to meet them, I could see expressions of shock on the soldiers’ faces. At least six wounded troops were pulled from the vehicles, one of them in really bad condition.
A wounded soldier is pulled out of his armored Humvee after returning from the front line.

They were from the Kirkuk regiment, who had gone in directly behind the regiment Arwa and Brice were embedded with.
“(ISIS fighters) were firing from a five-meter distance at us from all directions,” one soldier said. “I took out three, but my gun jammed and couldn’t carry on firing.”
Armored Humvees from the Kirkuk regiment retreat after facing fierce resistance from ISIS.

Their regiment had consisted of at least 35 Humvees and a couple of MRAPs, but only 12 Humvees had returned. Where were the rest?
“It is just us left,” one soldier told me. “There are seven other soldiers trapped inside a shop in the Karkukli neighborhood, and only God knows if they still alive.”
I was immediately concerned for Arwa and Brice. I called our senior producer to ask him whether they’d checked in with him.
Arwa had been expected to phone in a report live on CNN during the past hour, he said. But her call had never come.
A shocked Iraqi soldier -- he said an ISIS suicide car bomb detonated near his Humvee.

Along with other concerned CNN staff around the world, I began trying frantically to reach Arwa and Brice by phone or text. Nothing.
Then, thankfully, a call came from CNN’s international desk in Atlanta, conferencing me in to a call with Arwa.
The line wasn’t great — Arwa was calling from her satellite phone — but I could tell from her voice that she was scared.
“Hamdi, we have been ambushed,” she explained. “A suicide car bomb targeted our convoy and we are taking heavy fire. We are surrounded from all directions.”
On hearing those words, I felt as though one of my family was in danger. Arwa is like a younger sister to me, and I knew I had to do everything in my power, use all my contacts, to get her and Brice out of there.
I first met Arwa when I walked into CNN’s Baghdad bureau in 2004. She was young producer, clever, full of energy, with a big heart: the kind of person I connected with immediately.
When a bomb was thrown into my house that year, injuring my daughter, she brought a personal CD player for her to use. It meant a lot to me.

Hundreds of phone calls

CNN producer Hamdi Alkhshali remained behind the berm, keeping in touch with Arwa and Brice.

On learning of the danger she and Brice now faced, I immediately called Iraqi military commanders asking them to send reinforcements to save the Salahuddin regiment they were embedded with.
“Don’t worry,” a top brigade commander said. The regiment’s situation was good, and its forces were adequately prepared to hold their position, he assured me.
A counter-terrorism commander promised me that they were in the process of deploying a reinforcement regiment, call-sign Dayala, that would be at their position in roughly an hour.
Soldiers from the Kirkuk regiment yelled: "We should fix our vehicles and go back to help our mates who might be still alive."

When I called the commander again to see how far away reinforcements were, he said the plan had changed. When Kirkuk regiment had retreated, ISIS had managed to reinforce their position, and it was no longer an option to approach from that direction. Now they were advancing along a different route.
Exclusive: CNN reporter trapped in deadly ISIS attack

Exclusive: CNN reporter trapped in deadly ISIS attack

Exclusive: CNN reporter trapped in deadly ISIS attack 10:46
“Don’t worry, they are in good shape,” he said.
But of course I was worried. With every minute that passed, my chest squeezed a little tighter.
Occasionally, my mind wandered to memories of working with Arwa: arguing about a story script, laughing about something silly. Every explosion from the battlefield jolted me back to the brutal reality of her and Brice’s situation.

What went wrong

From Ottoman times through to the era of Saddam Hussein, the men of Mosul have had a reputation as the most fearsome, committed soldiers in Iraq.
When the Iraqi military was dismantled after the fall of Saddam in 2003, many of these soldiers joined al-Qaeda, and then ISIS.
On November 4, the day Arwa and Brice went in, ISIS initially showed little resistance in the first couple of hours of the battle.
Armored Humvees from Salahuddin regiment cross the defensive berm heading towards eastern Mosul.

Iraqi forces passed through three neighborhoods quickly, making the going look easy.
But that was ISIS’s plan.
ISIS militants then ambushed the Iraqi troops, destroying a couple of Humvees at the back of the Kirkuk convoy. The attack forced the rest of the regiment to retreat and left Arwa and Brice’s Salahuddin regiment stranded in the neighborhood of Aden, exposed to ISIS fire from all directions.
The CNN team was stranded in Mosul when the unit they were embedded with was ambushed.

“This poor unit got split,” Arwa explains via text. “They’ve got no back up, nothing. I know you are trying.”

A long, tough night

By now it was 5 p.m., just an hour from sundown. The commander tells me the reinforcement regiment, Diyala, is 400 meters away from the stranded unit’s position. But before they can reach them and extract Arwa and Brice, they need to cross a creek.
ISIS knows reinforcements are coming, and again they are prepared.
CNN photojournalist Brice Laine was injured when the armored car he was in took a hit.

At about 7 p.m., as Diyala regiment crosses the waterway, ISIS strikes. Two Humvees are damaged, a couple more immobilized and a number of soldiers wounded.
Diyala regiment is forced to focus on defending their position to prevent further losses in their ranks; rescuing Arwa and Brice is no longer an option.
I continue to frantically call military staff, looking for a solution. A commander tells me not to worry: both Salahuddin and Diyala regiments are fine, he says, and he will send his best regiment at first light to get them out.
Around 11 p.m., more Humvees come back from the front line. Foreign journalists emerge, but they have been to a different front and know nothing of Salahuddin’s situation.
The heavy gunfire and explosions from shelling and suicide car bombs don’t stop all night. Arwa and Brice’s unit is frustratingly close, less than a mile away.
Just after midnight there are three loud explosions; they sound like car bombs. I text Arwa to see if she is OK. Thankfully, she responds. She says the explosions sounded different to the others, and thinks they could be car bombs too.

45 minutes feels like 2 years

Around 3 a.m., I hear another another massive explosion — again, it sounds like a car bomb — coming from the direction of Arwa’s location.
I text her immediately. “R U OK?”
There’s no response.
I text again and again, but there’s nothing. I call my contacts among the commanders and officers, and even consider heading closer to the front line myself to see if I can find out any more information. I pace back and forth like a madman on the road behind the berm.
After 45 minutes, Arwa texts back: “Yes.”
She tells me they might try to sleep, as they are exhausted.
The next morning, at 8:25 a.m., the Mosul regiment at last mobilizes 36 armored Humvees and an MRAP on a rescue mission to reach the stranded units. I count every single vehicle as they pass.
It takes them an hour to reach the creek. They have to change their route because ISIS is poised in wait.
I update Arwa as the operation unfolds. Suddenly, sounds of gunfire and explosions intensify from their direction. I text Arwa to ask what is happening.
Saturday 8.11 a.m.: Arwa and the soldiers she was embedded with wait for backup.

At 9:02 a.m. she texts back: “We are surrounded again. Screwed.” I call more commanders, urging them to get the reinforcements in faster.
Another text at 9:12 a.m.: “Ammo low. Sounds of explosions. Building shaking.”

The reunion

I try calling the commander leading the rescue mission, but my calls don’t go through. I try others.
At 10:13 a.m. I manage to get the commander of the Mosul regiment on the phone, who tells me their status. It feels like a miracle — reaching people here, especially inside the battle zone, is all but impossible.
Inside shocking gun battle in Mosul

 Inside shocking gun battle in Mosul 03:17

I pass the stranded regiment’s status on to the rescue commander. “Soldiers are running out of ammo,” I tell him. “They need your help ASAP.”
“My forces are battling fiercely with the enemy,” he says. “We are only 350 meters away. I know the situation of the other regiment and we are doing everything we can to link up with them.”
Shortly before midday, I text Arwa to ask how the soldiers are holding up. She replies they are still fighting, but that most are injured and they’re running low on ammunition.
At 12:30 p.m., the reinforcements finally manage to reach to the stricken Salahuddin regiment, fighting through ISIS militants to secure a path and recover the wounded soldiers, along with my exhausted and traumatized colleagues.
CNN's team is reunited after Arwa Damon and Brice Laine were rescued from the front line in Mosul.

By 1:30 p.m., after what were among the toughest 24 hours of my life, two armored Humvees deliver Arwa and Brice, along with the most seriously wounded soldiers, back to my position.
To see my colleagues walking towards me in one piece fills me with indescribable joy.

US Army Races To Build New Cyber Corps

Army photo

A soldier from the Army’s offensive cyber brigade during an exercise at Fort Lewis

WASHINGTON: The US Army is rushing to stand up cyber forces but its progress shows both how far we’ve come, and how far we have to go.

“From an initial start of six officers in 2014… today we have 397 officers, 141 warrant officers, and 560 non-commissioned officers and soldiers” in the Army’s recently created cyber branch, the four-star Vice Chief of Staff, Gen. Daniel Allyn, told an Association of the US Army conference last week. That’s just over 1,000 specialists of all ranks. (Another 962 soldiers are in the related field of electronic warfare).

Army photo

Gen. Daniel Allyn

West Point and ROTC graduated 30 new cyber lieutenants this year and will ramp up to 45. Many more cadets want to join, but the newborn branch’s training pipeline can’t yet absorb them all.

“It is not your typical (Army) classroom environment,” said Col. Kenneth Rector, commandant of the Army Cyber School at Fort Gordon, Ga. “They are small classes.”

Like most Army cyber troops, Rector started out in another specialty — in his case Military Intelligence — before transferring to the new cyber branch. That diversity brings varied perspectives, but it further complicates training. Both the diverse student body and the complex subject matter militate against a lecture-hall, mass-production approach to education.

That said, production is ramping up. This year, Fort Gordon graduated its first Basic Office Leaders’ Course (BOLC) class of 21 officers. Next year, there’ll be multiple BOLC classes plus an Advanced Individual Training (AIT) course for enlisted personnel. In 2016, Rector said, Fort Gordon graduated 131 cyber operators; in 2017, the plan calls for 561.

What sparked this growth? Back in 2014 — just two and a half years ago — then-Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel ordered the military to add 6,000 cyber specialists by 2016. Today, Army soldiers make up about a third of this Cyber National Mission Force. (The rest are Air Force and Navy/Marines). All of the 41 teams the Army was tasked to form are now operational, Army Cyber Command says. Some 11 are still building up to full strength — they’re at what’s called Initial Operational Capability — while 30 are fully manned and operational.

Armyp hoto

Lt. Gen. Paul Nakasone

“Our no. 1 priority right now is to aggressively to defend our data, our networks, and our information systems,” said Lt. Gen. Paul Nakasone, who commanded the National Mission Force until last month, when he took the helm at Army Cyber Command.

What does Nakasone mean by “defense”? All the organizations we’ve mentioned report to Cyber Command, whose primary role is to defend the military’s own systems (collectively called) the Department of Defense Information Network (DODIN). It’s civilian agencies like the FBI that protect civilian networks and critical infrastructure day to day. But CYBERCOM is always on call for backup if the civilians get overwhelmed.

CYBERCOM would also lead any retaliatory cyber strike on Russia or other overseas adversaries beyond the reach of US law enforcement. Army Cyber is leading Task Force Ares, the all-service effort to hack the Islamic State, which uses the Internet for everything from propaganda to recruiting to command-and-control.

Besides these strategic missions, the Army is also experimenting with tactical cyber teams, which would protect units’ wireless networks on the battlefield and attack their enemies’. 18 months of wargames have already convinced the service to add two cyber defense specialists to each combat brigade — over 100 soldiers Army-wide — and it’s studying 15-soldier teams for higher echelons.

The Army’s also looking at its weapons systems, from tanks to helicopters to digital radios, to see which ones are vulnerable to hacking and might need urgent patches. With human error the pathway for most cyber attacks — clicking on a misleading link, opening a booby-trapped attachment, downloading a bad app — “the most important thing that we’re focused on right now is training our soldiers to be as vigilant operating their equipment as they are when they get into the combat patrol,” Gen. Allyn said.

In short, there’s tremendous demand for cyber expertise just to defend the Army’s own digits, let alone the nation. And the Army has to compete for talent not just with the other armed services and civilian agencies, but with the private sector as well, which pays vastly better and doesn’t send you to be shot at.

The military, however, can offer incentives that aren’t just financial. Besides the call to service, there’s also the fun factor of doing something you can’t do in civilian life. “The good news is, for our cyber professionals,  they can do things in defense of our nation that would get arrested for in the outside world,” said Allyn. “That is very attractive.”

The moment America knew

The moment America knew

Updated 9:55 AM ET, Wed November 9, 2016

Where were you, we’ll ask each other, days or years from now. Where were you when Donald J. Trump confounded pundits and upended projections to become the President-Elect of the United States?
It will be hard to forget such a moment, or the pivotal images that have immortalized it.
To set the stage, here is CNN’s Wolf Blitzer making the announcement:
Donald Trump elected president

 Donald Trump elected president 00:49
The emotion was instant. You could see it in the crowds dotted with bright red hats who cheered, sobbed and embraced at Trump’s election night event at the New York Hilton Midtown hotel.

It was a moment of pure elation.

The emotion was there too on the stunned faces of Hillary Clinton’s supporters who had gathered to celebrate what had, once, seemed like a likely victory.

For them, it was a moment of pure desolation.

In that moment, in the early hours of November 9 after nearly two years of an unprecedented and at times unbelievable campaign, the Empire State building glowed an uninterrupted red. Its facade bore a stories-high projection of Donald Trump: America’s next President.

Chicago Cubs win first World Series since 1908

Chicago Cubs win first World Series since 1908, beating Cleveland 8-7 in 10th inning of Game 7

Remington Announces New Series of RP9 and RP45 Handguns

Remington Announces New Series of RP9 and RP45 Handguns

Remington New Series of Handguns

The hype surrounding the release of Remington’s new series of RP9 and RP45 handguns is finally over. The new tilting-barrel, striker-fired handguns come with many anticipated new features, which points to the possibility of an extended family of Remington striker-fired pistols.

The most distinctive feature on these new firearms is their heavy chamfered barrel. Typically, tilting-barrel recoil guns have a slight chamfer on the barrel allowing it to pass under the slide, but the new RP family of handguns feature a much more extreme chamfered barrel surface.

OVER 30 Auctions Ending today!!!!

OVER 30 Auctions Ending today!!!!
View this email in your browser
Here are a few auctions ending today!!!
Click this link to take you to the auctions….

Auction

3 Hours, 13 Minutes remaining

Quantity 1

Auction

3 Hours, 13 Minutes remaining

Quantity 1

Auction

3 Hours, 13 Minutes remaining

Quantity 1

Auction

3 Hours, 13 Minutes remaining

Quantity 1

Auction

3 Hours, 13 Minutes remaining

Quantity 1

Auction

3 Hours, 13 Minutes remaining

Quantity 1

Auction

3 Hours, 13 Minutes remaining

Quantity 1

Auction

3 Hours, 13 Minutes remaining

Quantity 1

Auction

Quantity 1

Price Per Item   $250.00 13 Bids

Auction

3 Hours, 13 Minutes remaining

Quantity 1

Auction

3 Hours, 13 Minutes remaining

Quantity 1

Auction

3 Hours, 13 Minutes remaining

Quantity 1

Auction

3 Hours, 13 Minutes remaining

Quantity 1

Auction

3 Hours, 13 Minutes remaining

Quantity 1

Auction

3 Hours, 13 Minutes remaining

Quantity 1

Auction

3 Hours, 13 Minutes remaining

Quantity 1

Auction

3 Hours, 13 Minutes remaining

Quantity 1

Auction

3 Hours, 13 Minutes remaining

Quantity 1

Auction

3 Hours, 13 Minutes remaining

Quantity 1

Auction

3 Hours, 13 Minutes remaining

Quantity 1

Auction

3 Hours, 13 Minutes remaining

Quantity 1

Auction

3 Hours, 13 Minutes remaining

Quantity 1

Auction

3 Hours, 13 Minutes remaining

Quantity 1

Auction

3 Hours, 13 Minutes remaining

Quantity 1

Auction

3 Hours, 10 Minutes remaining

Quantity 1